Monday, October 25, 2010

Mimico and the First World War

The old municipality of Mimico is now located in the City of Toronto.  It was originally located in the Township of Etobicoke west of the City of Toronto.  It became a Police Village in 1905 which gave it limited autonomy from the Township of Etobicoke.  Further growth resulted in it becoming a full fledged separate municipality - the Village of Mimico in 1911.  As a result of further growth in its population it became the Town of Mimico in 1917.  It would remain a separate municipality until 1967 when it was forced to amalgamate with the Borough of Etobicoke.

The boundaries of the Town were a line from Lake Ontario up Dwight Avenue, over the railway tracks and along St. George Street up to Evans Avenue on the west; along Evans Avenue to Church Street (present day Royal York Road) then along Algoma Street to Grand Avenue then north one block and along Manitoba Street on the north; Mimico Creek at the north east corner then westerly along the railway track to a line extending south to the end of Victoria Avenue (which was originally a short distance east of Louisa Street), across the Lake Shore Road to Lake Ontario on the east; and, Lake Ontario.

According to Harvel Currell in The Mimico Story:

Mimico men...were soon to know the horrors of world war, and Mimico families were to become acquainted with the anxiety and grief that were to be Canada's lot for the next four years.

A large part of Mimico's population was made up of natives of the British Isles, most of them not too long removed from their native soil.

The ties of homeland and Empire were strong. Soon after war broke out, scores of young Mimico men had hurried to enlist. After brief training periods in quickly-erected army camps like Camp Bordon or Valcartier, they were hurried overseas and in the fighting before the end of 1914.

First Mimico victim of World War 1 was Albert Riddlesworth, of Manitoba Street.

Throughout the war, a steady stream of Mimico boys joined the colors as soon as they were old enough to enlist. Many were killed, many more wounded or disabled.

The following list of names is from the Honour Roll which was published in The Mimico Story by the Mimico Library Board in 1967. It is difficult to determine how this list was made. Most lived in Mimico at the time of their enlistment but some also lived outside of Mimico, or enlisted in Mimico, or may have lived in Mimico but their next of kin lived elsewhere (or vice versa), or may have moved to Mimico shortly after the war. It looks like some enlisted directly in the British forces or transferred into them at a later date.

It is unfortunate that the local paper The Advertiser, which was founded in 1917 by Edwin Eland, is missing for the critical years of the war and is only available starting in 1925.

I have done my best to find the various individuals but some remain blank, especially for those with a more common last name that makes searching difficult. I would be grateful for any assistance to make the biographical information here as complete as possible.

I can be reached at mimicohistory at hotmail.com.

All information and photographs on this site, other than those already attributed, are copyrighted and may not be used without my permission.

© Copyright Michael Harrison 2010.  All rights reserved.

Mimico Church Memorials

Many of the churches in Mimico during the time of the First World War contain Rolls of Honour for the members of their congregations that fought and died in the conflict.  The following names are taken from the various church histories that I have copies of.

Mimico Methodist Church (Wesley United Church)

Louis Andrews
Geo. Bailey
Earl Barlow (killed in action) (name should be Carl)
Robert Barlow
G. Batstone
Howard Batstone
K. Bridges
Ernest Brown
Manley G. Chisholm
James Cochrane
Gordon Edgar
Gordon Ferrier, M.D
Victor A. Ferrier (killed in action)
John Flowers
S. Gillham
Moses Griffiths
A. Ed. Harlock
Norman Harlock
Walter Harlock
Walter Harper
Charles Heather
W. Heather
Robert Hendry (killed in action)
William Hendry
Ernest Hogg
W. Hoskins
Joseph Hunter
W. Hutchins
Alfred James
Charles Johnson
Cecil Johnston
Gordon Johnson (killed in action)
Horace Lanchbury
Percy Lanchbury
C. Lewis
C. Lovring
J. Lubbock
Clifford McRea (killed in action)
W. Mason
Ed. C. Morgan (killed in action)
John Morgan (killed in action)
Wm. Munson
Erskine Odgen
Allen Parker, M.D. (killed in action)
Charles Parker
Roy Parker
Abram Pike
Wm. Porter
Henry Rose
Walter Shirley
Herbert Simmonds
A. W. Smith
Ernest Stirk

G. Tizzard (killed in action)
S. Tyrell
Kenneth Warner
Walter West
Richard Williams

Christ Church

I think that the Christ Church list only includes those that were killed in action as opposed to all those who enlisted.

C. H. Blake (killed in action)
T. Burn (killed in action)
J. Coulton (killed in action)
W. J. Higgins (killed in action)
A. Hockney (killed in action)
E. Hogg (killed in action)
J. McKinstry (killed in action)
Jno Neale
A. Riddlesworth (killed in action)
C. Stoot (killed in action)
N. Telford (killed in action)
W. G. Tizzard (killed in action)
L. Wood (killed in action)

Monday, April 19, 2010

Mimico War Memorial

Mimico War Memorial - Vimy Ridge Park, Mimico
© Michael Harrison 2010

According to New Toronto In Story and Picture, the Lake Shore Chapter of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire (I.O.D.E.) was founded in September 1914 when "Mrs. Forbes Godfrey invited Mrs. F. Fetherstonhaugh, organizer for the I.O.D.E. to assist in organizing a chapter in the district comprising New Toronto, Mimico, Humber Bay and Etobicoke."  The new chapter was called "The Union Jack". 

Following World War One the chapter set about the work to create a fitting monument to those who had served and those who had lost their lives.  They set about to create a Memorial Park in Mimico.  In 1921 the voters of Mimico approved expenditures to add to the funds already raised by the Union Jack Chapter of the I.O.D.E. to purchase land for the park.  About the same time plaques listing the names of those who had served and those that had died were placed in the park.  Work on a war memorial began in 1930 at a gore shaped park on the Lake Shore Road.  According to the Globe and Mail, on October 12, 1930 more than 5000 people assembled at the Lake Shore Road and Queens Drive after parading from Memorial Park to the site via Church Street (Royal York Road), Mimico Avenue and the Lake Shore Road to attend the unveiling of the Mimico war memorial.  "Following a hymn ex-Mayor, W. E. Savage called upon Mrs. W.H. Riddleworth, mother of the first Mimico soldier to fall in the Great War, to unveil the memorial.  Then Rev. William Fingland, himself a veteran, stepped forward and slowly read the names of those men who had left Mimico to serve their country, and who never returned.  One by one as they were read, the silence was broken only by the sobs of mothers and widows who had gathered to witness the ceremony in honor (sic) of their loved ones."  There was discussion at the time to move the plaques to the memorial site, however the idea generated some controversy, and the plaques remained in Memorial Park.  It was only after 1967 when the Town of Mimico was dissolved and amalgamated with the Borough of Etobicoke that they were also moved and joined up with the cenotaph in present day Vimy Ridge Park at Lake Shore Blvd. West and Queens Avenue.












© Michael Harrison 2010

Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Photo of Soldiers on the Lake Shore Road



This photo was found recently in a house on MacDonald Street in Mimico.  There was no identifying information on the photo nor a date.  The building in the background was the Heather Block on the Lake Shore Road at the foot of Mimico Avenue.  It was recently demolished and the land added to the local waterfront park - Amos Waites Park.  The sign that can be seen on the building is Heather and Son Plumbing.  Wilton Heather was one of the Mimico men who enlisted in the war. 

It is not certain when this photo was taken.  Was it a group of men who had recently enlisted and were about to leave for France?  Or was it a reunion after the war?  Also, who are they?

One knowledgeable individual emailed me with the following response:

Almost certain it's a wartime training picture as the men are all in uniform - unlikely in a post war reunion and none of the men are wearing any medals/ribbons. The weather is cold as several men are wearing gloves and there is snow on the ground but no greatcoats are seen ( typical of a parade). The ages of the men tend to be either very young or old, typical of ambulance drivers/medical corps. Only one officer present in the middle with the open collar. I can also see only one corporal and no others with rank insignia. Again more likely in a training camp picture.


The picture has been staged in a spot where there are some form of risers where the back row of men are standing higher and the front row are sitting on something. I suspect the men have just been in a parade and are having their pictures taken as a group along with many other regiments/battalions at the same time. A bit too formal for a casual shot taken by a passer-by or  someone from Heather's with a friend in the group.  Note the wannabee in the back row. One of Heather's employees? - One in  every crowd! :-))

Could it have been the 220th Battalion which held a church parade in Mimico in May 1916?  Seems unlikely given the weather conditions apparent in the photo.  Many Mimico men were members of the 12th Regiment, York Rangers which became part of the 220th Battalion.

If you have any information on the photo or can identify any of the individuals please let me know at mimicohistory at hotmail.com.

Missed Men

During the research for this site I have come across some others linked to Mimico that appear to have been missed from the Honour Roll.  These include the following:

Private William George Alexander - 405161

According to his attestation papers dated August 17, 1915 at Toronto, William George Alexander was born on July 2, 1883 in Dunwich, Suffolk, England.  He listed his wife Elizabeth Alexander, Port Credit, as his next of kin.  He was a labourer and had no previous military experience.  He was 32 years and 1 month of age and stood 5 feet 8 inches high.  He had brown eyes and hair and a fair complexion.  He had a tatoo on is right arm.   He was a member of the Church of England.  He was a Private in the 18th Battalion Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment) when he was killed on September 15, 1916 in action at the Somme.  His remains were never found as he is listed on the Vimy Memorial.  According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission he was the son of William G. Alexander, of Henton, Suffolk, England; husband of Charlotte E. Alexander, of 16 Albert Avenue, Mimico Beach, Ontario.

courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial


Corporal Cecil Johnston Bovaird - 337957


Cecil Johnston Bovaird - courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial

According to his attestation papers dated June 23, 1916 at Toronto, Cecil Johnston Bovaird, 54 Simpson Avenue, Toronto was born on February 9, 1894 in Prescott, Ontario.  He listed his mother Laura Elnora Bovaird, 54 Simpson Avenue, as his next of kin.  He was a Barrister-at-Law, and had previous military experience of 5 months as a Lieut. in the 109th Regiment. He was 22 years and 4 months of age and stood 5 feet 11 1/2 inches in height.  He had grey eyes, dark brown hair and a dark complexion.  He had scars on his neck and left elbow.  He also had an appendicitis scar.  

He was a Corporal in the 2nd Brigade of the Canadian Field Artillery when he was killed on May 3, 1917.  According to the CEF burial register he died of wounds.  "This non-commissioned officer was wounded while on duty at a gun position, being hit by a piece of an enemy shell.  He was evacuated to No. 42 Casualty Clearing Station, where he succumbed to his wounds".  He is buried in the Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension in Pas de Calais, France.  According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission he was the son of William James and Laura Ellnora Bovaird, of Mimico Beach, Ontario. Native of Prescott, Ontario.

His brother Harold also enlisted but survived the war.


The following information is from the Osgoode Hall Roll of Honour:

Lt. Cecil J. Bovaird. Lieutenant Cecil Johnstone Bovaird. Son of W.J. Bovaird, contractor, of Toronto, Ontario. Graduated from high school in 1910. Admitted as a law student in 1911 at age 16. Called to the bar on 10 February 1916. Bombardier 82nd Howitzer Battery. Killed 14 May 1917 (note that some of the information here is at odds with the official records).

Pte. Harold Stewart Bovaird - 862020

According to his attestation papers dated January 25, 1916 at Toronto, Harold Stewart Bovaird of 54 Simpson Avenue, Toronto was born on April 1, 1890 at Cardinal, Ontario.  He listed his mother Laura Bovaird, 54 Simpson Avenue, Toronto, as his next of kin.  He was a transfer agent with the Post Office and had 2 years experience as a Private in the 10th Regiment.  He was 25 years and 9 months of age and stood 5 feet 8 1/2 inches tall.  He had hazel eyes, black hair and a fresh complexion.  He was a Presbyterian.  His brother Cecil also enlisted.  As noted in Cecil's obituary Harold was a member of the Canadian Postal Corps.

His brother Cecil also enlisted but was killed.

According to the 1921 Toronto City directory Harold, clerk, and his mother Laura were living on the south side of the Lake Shore Road, Mimico.

Ross Laurier Gauld

According to his attestation papers dated October 2, 1918 at Toronto Ross Laurier Gauld, Mimico, Ontario was born on October 12, 1900 in Mimico. He listed his mother Janet Gauld, Mimico as his next of kin. He was a clerk and had no previous military experience. He was 17 years and 11 months of age and stood 5 feet 6 1/2 inches tall. He had blue eyes, light brown hair and a fair complexion. He had a scar under his left eye. He was a Presbyterian.

According to the 1921 Toronto City directory he was a clerk living with his father George R. Gauld, Department Superintendant Victoria Industrial School.

Cpl. Alvin Walter Leach - 648517

According to his attestation papers dated February 11, 1916 at North Bay, Ontario, Alvin Walter Leach of Sturgeon Falls, Ontario was born on July 15, 1896 in Sturgeon Falls, Ontario.  He listed his mother Sarah Jean Leach, Mimico, Ontario as his next of kin.  He listed his occupation as clerk and indicated that he was a member of the 97th Regiment.  He was 19 years and 4 months of age and stood 5 feet 4 3/4 inches high.  He had grey eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion.  He was a member of the Church of England. 

Pte. Albert Norman Ormsby - 4735 and 491027

According to his first set of attestation papers dated May 3, 1915 at Toronto, Albert Norman Ormsby was born on March 1, 1895 at Toronto.  He listed his father Albert Ormsby, Mimico, Ontario as his next of kin.  He indicated that he was a draftsman and that he had no previous military experience.  He was 20 years and 1 month of age and stood 5 feet 6 1/2 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, light brown hair and a fair complexion.  He was a "Protestant".
 
According to his second set of attestation papers dated June 5, 1917, he listed his address as Mimico Beach.  He listed his mother Sarah Ormsby, Mimico Beach as his next of kin.  He indicated that he was born on March 1, 1897 and that he was a designer who has 4 months experience in the 4th O.M.R. - Pte. #4735.  At the top of the first page of the papers it says "U of T Training" and "1st Tank Battalion, C.M.G.C. C.E.F."  He was 20 years and 2 months of age at 5 feet 7 1/4 inches in height.  He had two moles on this left chest, two moles on his stomach, five moles on his right shoulder, a scar on his forehead and a mole on the centre of his back.  He was a Presbyterian. 
 
According to the 1911 census he was actually born in March 1896 - not 1895 or 1897.

Capt. Ernest James Salter - Royal Flying Corps

According to http://www.theaerodrome.com/ Ernest James Salter was the son of Theophilus L. and Mary Helen (Coultis) Salter, Ernest James Salter joined the Royal Flying Corps on 3 June 1917. In the summer of 1918, he was posted to 54 Squadron in France. The highest scoring ace to serve with this squadron, Salter scored nine victories flying the Sopwith Camel before being badly wounded on 2 September 1918.

Notice that he was wounded appeared in the Toronto Star on September 10, 1918. 

According to the 1914 Toronto City directory Theodore Salter was the bandmaster at the Victoria Industrial School, living in the same location with his family.

The following information is from http://www.airforce.ca/

SALTER, Captain Ernest James - Chevalier, Legion of Honour (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 November 1918. Born in Greenbank, Ontario (near Ottawa) about 1897. Home in Mimico, Ontario; joined RFC in Canada, 3 June 1917; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.7211, 27 August 1917; sailed from Canada, 29 October 1917; graded as Flying Officer, 26 February 1918; Captain, 9 August 1918; to France, 15 March 1918; with No.54 Squadron, 19 March to 12 April 1918 (hospitalized) and again from 19 May to 2 September 1918 (wounded). Invalided to UK, 7 September 1918; at Repatriation Camp, 29 March 1919. Died in Oakville, Ontario, 26 March 1959. Ottawa newsclipping of 28 March 1959 says he returned to Canada in 1919 and was engaged in bush flying for three years; credited with 18 enemy aircraft shot down and was a bombing instructor in Second World War. No citation other than "in recognition of valuable services in connection with the war".

SALTER, Captain Ernest James - Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of valuable services in connection with the war."

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1838/204/208/13 has a letter dated 22 July 1918 from the Officer Commanding, 51st Wing to Headquarters, 9th Brigade, Royal Air Force. It states that he had joined the Royal Air Force [sic] in November 1917 and had been in France since March 1918. With this was a recommendation for an unspecified non-immediate award, sent on the same day (22 July 1918) from the Commanding Officer, No.54 Squadron to the Officer Commanding, No.51 Wing:

For exceptional gallantry and devotion to duty.

On 21 July 1918 he went over to an enemy aerodrome and attacked five two-seater Halberstadter and crashed two near their aerodrome.

On the evening of the same day when on Offensive Patrol his formation was attacked by 35 enemy aeroplanes. After clever manoeuvring he succeeded in bringing down a Fokker biplane in flames.

On 5 July 1918 when with nine other Camels attacked a formation of 30 enemy aeroplanes, bringing down one Albatross.

On 4 July 1918 he attacked four Hannoveraner and brought one down.

On 19 June 1918 he chased a two-seater about seven miles over the lines at low altitude and sent it down out of control.

His example of gallantry of the highest order has been a very great influence in the squadron.

Although no British award was granted, this clearly became the basis for one of his French awards, for another document has the following statement; although in French, the absence of accents indicates it was typed on a British typewriter:

A fait preuve d'un courage exceptionnel et d'un parfait sentiment de son devoir en detruisant six avion ennemis.

Les 19 juin a force un biplane ennemis a atterrir desempare - a descendu les 4 et 5 juillet a attaque au dessus du terrain de Seringes, cinq biplanes Halberstadt dont deux se sont ecrases au sol.

Pendant la meme journee au cours d'une seconde patrouille attaque par un group de 35 Fokker biplanes a descendu d'entre eux en flammes

Thursday, March 4, 2010

Pte. L. Andrews - 201725

According to his attestation papers dated November 8, 1915 at Toronto, Lewis Harold Andrews, Lake Shore Road, Mimico was born on September 21, 1897 at Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, England.  He listed his grandfather, David Andrews, Deanshanger, Stony Stafford, Buckinghamshire, England as his next of kin.  He was a labourer and had no previous military experience.  He was 18 years and 1 month of age and stood 5 feet 5 1/2 inches high.  He had brown eyes, fair hair and a fresh complexion.  He had a small mole under his right arm and on the right side of his face near his ear.  He was a Methodist.

Spr. H. F. Archer - 728426

According to his attestation papers dated January 18, 1916 at Mimico, Hyla Frederick Archer of Mimico, was born on June 4, 1882 at Walsall, Staffordshire, England.  He listed his wife Mrs. Margaret Archer, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was an emery wheel maker and was an active member of the 12th Regiment, York Rangers.  He was 33 years and 7 months of age and stood 5 feet 8 3/4 inches tall.  He had brown eyes and dark hair and complexion.  He was a member of the Church of England.

In the 1914 Toronto City directory he is listed as a brickmaker living on the west side of Albert Avenue, Mimico.

Cpt. R. Atkey

According to his attestation papers dated February 11, 1915 at Toronto, Richmond Henry Atkey was born on December 15, 1885 in Ventnor, England.  He listed Maude M Atkey (Atkey crossed out and Mitchell written in) as his next of kin.  He was a dental student and indicated that he was a member of the Officers Training Corps.   He was 29 years and 2 months of age and stood 5 feet 6 1/2 inches tall.  He had dark brown eyes and hair and a dark complexion.  He had two scars on the outside of his left thigh and two scars on the left side of his back.  He was a Presbyterian.

According to the Torontonensia University Monthly, Volume XV 1914-1915 (April 1915), University of Toronto Press, Atkey was awarded his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree by the University of Toronto on February 25, 1915.  This was a special Convocation for "those leaving for the front".

According to the Canadian Medical Association Journal (1915?) Atkey was assigned to the unit known as No. 2 General Hospital, which was mobilized at the old General Hospital on Gerrard Street, and made ready to leave for the front.

By 1918 he was a member of the Dental Corps and was reported ill in the August 19, 1918 edition of the Toronto World.   Whatever the illness was it appears to have resulted in him being invalided in March 1918 according to the entry below in the University of Toronto Roll of Service.


The following entry is included in the University of Toronto Roll of Service 1914-1918:

Atkey, Richmond Henry; D.D.S. 1915; C.O.T.C
C.A.M.C. No. 2 C.C.S., Pte., Feb. 1915; Cpl.; O/S. Apl. 1915; C.A.D.C, Sergt., Lieut., Capt.; France, Feb. 19 16, att. No. 8 Can. Fd. Amb.; Ypres, Somme, Arras, Vimy, Hill 70, Passchendaele, Vimy sec; Invalided Mar. 1918.

Pte. G. E. Bailey - 778514

According to his attestation papers dated January 24, 1916 at Mimico, George Ernest Bailey of Symons Street, Mimico was born on August 12, 1883 in Toronto.  He listed his wife, Katherine May Bailey, Symons Street, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a clerk and had no previous military experience.  He was 32 years and 6 months of age and stood 5 feet 7 inches tall.  He had brown hair, dark hair and complexion.  He was a Methodist.

In the 1914 Toronto City directory he is listed as a carpenter boarding in the home of Robert Barlow on the north side of Mimico Avenue.

F. Banks

Pte. J. D. Banks - 778516

According to his attestation papers dated January 24, 1916 at Mimico, James Derbyshire Banks of Mimico was born on January 10, 1873 in Lancashire, England.  He listed his wife Mrs. Mary Banks, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a labourer and an active member of the 12th Regiment, York Rangers.  He was 43 years of age and stood 5 feet 6 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, dark hair and complexion.  He was a Methodist. 

According to the 1921 Toronto City directory he was a labourer living on the west side of Burlington Street, Mimico.

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Pte. Sam Barclay - 778849

According to his attestation papers dated February 23, 1916 at New Toronto, Samuel Priest Barclay, 6th Street, New Toronto, was born on June 7, 1880 in Midlothian, Scotland.  He listed his wife Elizabeth Barclay, 6th Street, New Toronto has his next of kin.  He was a labourer and an active member of the 12th Regiment, York Rangers.  He was 35 years and 8 months of age and was 5 feet 4 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, fair hair and complexion.  He was Presbyterian.

Private C. Barlow - 135098

Carl Barlow (left) and his brother Robert Barlow (right) circa 1916
courtesy of Andy McClure

According to his attestation papers dated July 29, 1915 at Toronto, Carl Barlow was born on February 4, 1897 in Humber Bay, Ontario.  He listed his father Robert Barlow, Mimico Avenue, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a tinsmith and had no previous military experience.  He was 18 years and 5 months of age and stood 5 feet 5 inches in height.  He had blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.  He was a Methodist.  According to the 1911 census he was actually born in Feb 1898 and so was only 17 years old at the time of his enlistment.

Carl was originally part of the 74th Canadian Overseas Battalion.  He embarked on the Empress of Britain from Halifax on March 29, 1916 and arrived in Liverpool, England on April 9, 1916.  In June 1916 he was transferred to the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifle Battalion in France.  He was killed on October 10, 1916 in the Courcelette sector at the Battle of the Somme.  His remains were never found as he is listed on the Vimy Memorial in France.  According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website he was 18 years old and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Barlow of 104 Mimico Avenue, Mimico, Ontario.

His brothers Samuel, William and Robert also enlisted but survived the war.






Images courtesy of Andy McClure

R. Barlow C-4382

Robert Barlow (right) with his brother Carl Barlow (left) circa 1916
courtesy of Andy McClure

Robert Barlow joined the British forces circa 1915 when he enlisted in the Kings Royal Rifle Corps.  As he enlisted directly in the British forces he has no Canadian attestation papers.

His brothers Carl, William and Samuel also enlisted.

Pte. S. Barlow - 2499567





Samuel Barlow
courtesy of Andy McClure

According to his attestation papers dated December 7, 1917 at Toronto Samuel Barlow of Mimico Avenue, Mimico was born on March 18, 1899 in Mimico.  He listed his father Robert Barlow, Mimico Avenue as his next of kin.  He was a labourer and had no previous military experience.   He was 18 years and 9 months of age and stood 5 feet 5 1/2 inches high.  He had grey eyes, brown hair and a medium complexion.  He had a birthmark on his left hip.  He was a Methodist.

Sam originally enlisted with the York and Simcoe Foresters at Toronto on December 7, 1917 but was later transferred to the 9th Draft Railway Construction Troops Military District No. 2.  He arrived in England on February 16, 1918 and was posted to the 11th Canadian Railway Troops in France in March 1918.  In December 1918 he was posted back to England as part of the 4th Reserve Battalion.  In January 1919 he proceeded to Kimmel Park in Wales and sailed back to Canada in February 1919.  He was discharged and demobilized on March 4, 1919 upon arrival in Canada.  

According to the 1911 census, Samuel Barlow son of Robert Barlow of Mimico was actually born on May 1900 and so he was actually 17 years old when he enlisted. 

His brothers Carl, William and Robert also enlisted.

In the 1921 Toronto City directory he is living with his father Robert on the north side of Mimico Avenue, Mimico.

Pte. W. Barlow - 472900


William Barlow
courtesy of Andy McClure

According to his attestation papers dated December 31, 1915 at Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, William Barlow of Borden, Sask., was born on January 14, 1893 in Toronto.  He listed his father, Robert Barlow, Mimico, Ontario as his next of kin.  He was a farmer and had no previous military experience.  He was 22 years and 11 months of age and stood 5 feet 3 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, fair hair and complexion.  He was a Methodist.

Bill was originally part of the 65th Overseas Battlion.  At the time of his enlistment he was living as a farmer in Borden Sask.  He arrived in England on June 29, 1916.  On June 30, 1916 he was transferred to the 46th Overseas Battalion Medical Section.  He proceeded to France on August 10, 1916 as part of the Canadian Army Medical Corps.  In January 1917 he was sick with "Trench Fever" and related lung and heart conditions.  He was released from hospital in February 1917 and transferred to the 22nd Field Hospital.  In July 1917 he suffered from "Trench Fever" for a second time.  By September 1917 he condition worsened and he was sent to the Canadian Military Hospital in Bramshott, England.  In October 1917 he was released from hospital and sent to work in the Canadian Army Medical Corps Depot in Bramshott.  However he never fully recovered from his illnesses and was sent back to Canada on January 31, 1918.  He was discharged on March 11, 1918 in Toronto, physically unfit for service thought it was noted on his records that his conduct and character while in service was "very good".

According to the 1911 census William Barlow, son of Robert of Mimico was actually born in January 1890 so he would have been almost 26 years of age.

His brothers Carl, Samuel, and Robert also enlisted. 

Cpl. A. T. Barton - 778323

According to his attestation papers dated January 10, 1916 at Mimico, Arthur Thomas Barton of Mimico, Ontario was born on October 20, 1895 in Mimico.  He listed his father Thomas Barton, Mimico, as his next of kin.  He was a farmer and an active member of the 12th Regiment, York Rangers.  He was 20 years and 3 months of age and stood 5 fee 11 1/2 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, fair hair and complexion.  He had a "compound fracture of a rib below right hip" ?  He was a member of the Church of England.

C. Batstone

There do not appear to be any attestation papers with this initial for Canada.

H. Batstone

Could this be Sgt. William Harold Batstone who's attestation papers have been lost?

Cpl. L. Beaton - 778519

According to his attestation papers dated January 24, 1916 at Mimico Lachlan Beaton of Mimico was born on March 27, 1882 in Renfrew, Scotland.  He listed his wife Mrs. Bertha Beaton, Mimico, Ontario as his next of kin.  He was a stationary engineer and had no previous military experience.  He was 33 years and 10 months of age and stood 5 feet 9 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, dark hair and complexion.  The little toe on his right foot was deflected.  He was a Presbyterian.

In the 1921 Toronto City directory he is listed as living on the south side of Vanevery Street, Mimico.

Cpl. G. Beatty - 157536

According to his attestation papers dated September 20, 1915 at Toronto, George Alfred Beatty was born on May 22, 1897 in Allandale, Ontario.  He listed his father Benjamin Beatty, Church Street, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a plumber and had no previous military experience.  He was 18 years and 4 months of age and stood 5 feet 9 1/4 inches tall.  He had light blue eyes, dark brown hair and a fresh complexion.  He had a one inch scar on his thigh.  He was a member of the Church of England.

In the 1914 Toronto City directory Benjamin Beatty is listed as a yardman living on the north side of Mimico Avenue, Mimico.

Lt. F. P. Behan

According to his attestation papers dated September 22, 1914 at Valcartier, Quebec, P. Felton Behan was born on December 30, 1876 in Toronto.  He listed his mother Mrs. J. B. Behan, Mimico, Ontario as his next of kin.  He was a farmer and had no previous military experience.  He was 28 years and 8 months of age and stood 5 feet 6 1/2 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion.  He had a scar on his right side, a mole on his left shoulder, and a scar on his left forearm.  He was a member of the Church of England. 

In both the 1914 and 1921 Toronto City directories there is a Julia Behan (widow George H.) living on the west side of Buckingham Street, Mimico.

Pte. F. Bickmore - 136452

According to his attestation papers dated November 8, 1915 at Toronto, Frederick George Bickmore of Warden Street, Mimico was born on June 17, 1895 in Toronto.  He listed his mother Eliza Bickmore, Warden Street, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a labourer and had no previous military experience.  He was 20 years and 4 months of age and stood 5 feet 7 inches tall.  He had brown eyes, dark brown hair and a dark complexion.  He had a scar from a hernia operation, and scars on below his left knee, on his right elbow and over his right eye.  He was a member of the Church of England. 

According to the 1921 Toronto City directory he was a machinist living on the north side of Warden Street, Mimico.

Pte. D. Birrell - 405530

According to his attestation papers dated April 5, 1915 at Toronto, David Wishart Birrell was born on September 16, 1891 in Friecham, Scotland.  He listed his mother Mrs. Birrell, Nivingston, Cleish, Kinross, Scotland as his next of kin.  He was a carpenter and had no previous military experience.  He was 23 years and 6 months of age and stood 5 feet 4 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.  He had a mole on his left shoulder.  He was a Presbyterian. 

He was a Private in the 4th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment) when he was killed in action on October 20, 1918 near Marchiennes.  He was buried in Hasnon Churchyard in France.  The Commonwealth War Graves Commission website indicates that he was the son of David and Christina Birrell, of Carsegour, Kinross, Scotland.

His brother William also enlisted and was killed.

Pte. W. Birrell - 405529

According to his attestation papers dated May 12, 1915 at Toronto, William Renton Birrell was born on October 28, 1889 in Frechein (?), Forfarshire, Scotland.  He listed his father Mr. David Birrell, Kevingstone (?), Kenoshire (?) Scotland as his next of kin.  He was a florist and had no previous military experience.  He was 25 years of age and stood 5 feet 7 inches tall. 

He was a Private in the 4th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment) when he died of wounds in Charing Cross War Hospital, Agar Street, London on October 2, 1916.  He is buried in the Leuchars Cemetery, UK.

His brother David also enlisted and was killed.

Pte. E. D. Blair - 778599

According to his attestation papers dated Janauary 31, 1916 at Mimico, Edward Doig Blair of Burlington Street, Mimico was born on December 10, 1881 in Carnoustie, Scotland.  He listed his wife Mrs. Alexandrina Blair, Burlington Street, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a plasterer and an active member of the 12th Regiment, York Rangers.  He was 34 years and 2 months of age and stood 5 feet 7 1/2 inches high.  He had brown eyes, black hair and a dark complexion.  He was a Presbyterian.

He enlisted the same day as his brother James.

In the 1914 Toronto City directory he is listed as a plasterer living on the north side of Victoria Street, Mimico. 

In the 1921 Toronto City directory he has the same occupation living on the east side of Burlington Street, Mimico.

Pte. J. H. Blair - 778598

According to his attestation papers January 31, 1916 at Mimico, James Hardie Blair of 49 Victoria Street, Mimico was born on June 17, 1885 at Carnoustie, Scotland.  He listed his wife, Mrs. Joan Blair, 29 Victoria Street, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a lineman and was an active member of the 12th Regiment, York Rangers.  He was 30 years and 7 months of age and stood 5 feet 6 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, fair hair and complexion.  He was a Presbyterian.

He enlisted the same day as his brother Edward. 

In the 1914 Toronto City directory he is listed as a machinist living on the north side of Victoria Street, Mimico.

Private C. H. Blake - 285443

According to his attestation papers dated June 15, 1916 at Toronto, Charles Herbert Blake of Melrose Street, Mimico was born on April 27, 1897 on the Isle of Wight, England.  He listed his mother, Mrs. Paulina Blake, Melrose Street, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a plumber and had 2 months previous military experience with 126th O.S. Battalion and 2 months with the 84th Battalion.  He was also an active member of the 12th Regiment, York Rangers.  He was 19 years and 2 months of age and stood 5 feet 6 inches in height.  He had grey eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.  He had a scar on his right knee.  He was a member of the Church of England.

His brother Leonard also enlisted.

He was a Private in "A" Company, 75th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment) when he was killed on September 2, 1918.  According to the CEF death register "this soldier was killed during the attack and capture of the ridge and sunken road at the storming of Drocourt-Queant Switch Line, between the town of Dury and the Arras Cambrai Road".  He was buried at Dury Mill British Cemetery in France.  According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website he was the son of Herbert and Pauline Blake, of 33 Norval Avenue, West Toronto. Born at Carisbrooke, Isle of Wight, England.

Article courtesy of the Virtual Canadian War Memorial

Ss. L. Blake - 163543

According to his attestation papers dated August 5, 1915 at Toronto, Leonard Alfred Blake was born on January 11, 1896 at Newfort GBW (?), England.  He listed his father Herbert Blake, Melrose Street, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a journalist and had no previous military experience.  He was 19 years and 7 months of age and stood 5 feet 8 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, dark brown hair and a dark complexion.  He was a member of the church of England.

His brother Charles also enlisted but was killed.  According to Charles obituary Leonard was with the Records Department in London.

T. Boulton

Lcp. F. Bozzard - 769977

According to his attestation papers dated January 10, 1916 at Toronto, Frederick Bozzard of Heman Street, Mimico was born on May 22, 1897 in Birminghan, England.  He listed his mother Alice Bozzard, Heman Street, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a steamfitter and had no previous military experience.   He was 18 years and 8 months of age and stood 5 feet 7 1/2 inches tall.  He had light brown eyes, brown hair and a medium complexion.  He had a mole on his left abdomen and left armpit and scars on his lower lip and left eye.

In the 1921 Toronto City directory his father William Bozzard is listed as a shipper living on the north side of Murrie Avenue, Mimico.

Sgt. G. A. Brandow - 769105

According to his attestation papers dated December 24, 1915 at Toronto, George Alexander Brandow of 3rd Street, New Toronto was born on October 12, 1894 at St. Williams, Ontario.  He listed his sister Mrs. Mabel Dyer, 6th Street, New Toronto as his next of kin.  He was a plumber and had no previous military experience.  He was 21 years and 2 months of age and stood 5 feet 8 1/2 inches tall.  He had brown eyes, dark brown hair and a fresh complexion.  He had a mole on his left wrist and a scar on the back of his left hand.  He was a Presbyterian.

In the 1921 Toronto City directory he is listed as a clerk boarding at the home of A. W. Boulter on the north side of Mimico Avenue, Mimico.

Spr. J. E. Breakspear - 778492

According to his attestation papers dated January 22, 1916 at Mimico, Jesse Edward Breakspear of Mimico, Ontario was born on November 6, 1888 in Oxford, England.  He listed his father, William Breakspear, Northleigh, Oxford, England as his next of kin.  He was a bricklayer and was an active member of the 12th Regiment, York Rangers. He was 27 years and 2 months of age and stood 5 feet 9 inches tall.  He had blue eyes and dark hair and complexion.  He was a member of the Church of England.  

In the 1921 Toronto City directory he is listed as a bricklayer living on the north side of Symons Street, Mimico.

Pte. J. Brennan - 778422

According to his attestation papers dated January 17, 1916 at Mimico, Joseph Brennan of Mimico, Ontario was born on March 1, 1885 in Lancashire, England.  He listed his wife, Mrs. Nellie Brennan, Mimico, as his next of kin.  He was a labourer and an active member of the 12th Regiment, York Rangers.  He was 30 years and 10 months of age and stood 5 feet 9 1/2 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, fair hair and complexion.  He was Roman Catholic.

In the 1921 Toronto City directory he is listed as a car repairer living on the west side of Station Road, Mimico.

R. Bridges

A. Brown

Pte. E. Brown - 140621

According to his attestation papers dated November 15, 1915 at Toronto, Ernest Brown of Robert Street, Mimico was born on November 14, 1897 at Peterboro, Ontario.  He listed his mother Christiana Brown, Robert Street, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a driver and had no previous military experience. He was 18 years of age and stood 5 feet 5 3/4 inches tall.  He had blue hair, fair hair and complexion.  He had a three inch scar on his left knee; a mole on his left collar bone and a small mole on his left cheek.  He was a Methodist.

According to the 1921 Toronto City directory Christiana Brown was the widow of William living on the west side of Robert Street, Mimico.

Pte. P. Brown - 2498052

According to his attestation papers dated July 26, 1917 at Toronto, Percy Brown of Robert Street, Mimico was born on August 30, 1892 in Kingston, Ontario.  He listed his wife Betha Alice Brown, Robert Street, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a motorman and had no previous military experience.   He was 24 years and 11 months of age and stood 5 feet 3 3/4 inches tall.   He had blue eyes, light brown hair and a fair complexion.  He had a scar on both legs.  He was a Methodist.

Private T. W. Burn - 778517

According to his attestation papers dated January 24, 1916 at Mimico, Thomas William Burn of Mimico was born on June 2, 1887 in Hexham, England.  He listed his wife Mrs. Eva Burn, Mimico as his next of kin.  He was a shoemaker and had no previous military experience.  He was 28 years and 7 months of age and stood 5 feet 7 1/2 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, fair hair and complexion.  He was a member of the Church of England.  

He was a Sergeant in the 1st Battalion, Canadian Railway Troops when he died of pneumonia at the Military Hospital in Ripon on February 2, 1919.  He was buried in the Hexam Cemetery in England.  The Commonwealth War Graves Commission website notes that he was the husband of Eva Burn, of Macdonald St., Mimico, Ontario.

In the 1914 Toronto City directory he is listed as a machinist living on the north side of Macdonald Street, Mimico.

Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Cpl. F. A. Bush - 778982

According to his attestation papers dated March 10, 1916 at Mimico, Frederick Albert Bush of Mimico was born on December 31, 1891 in Bristol, England.  He listed his father, Albert Bush, Mimico, as his next of kin.  He was a labourer and an active member of the 12th Regiment, York Rangers. He was 24 years old and stood 5 feet 8 inches tall.  He had grey eyes and dark hair and complexion.  He was Roman Catholic.

In the 1914 Toronto City directory he is listed as a labourer boarding at the home of Michael Byrne on the west side of Louisa Street, Mimico.